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Story behind Duckworth-Lewis method

Story behind Duckworth-Lewis method

Published Date: 27 Apr 2016 | Update : 27 Apr 2016
The Duckworth-Lewis method is one of the most talked of topics of cricket nowadays. Most of the cricket loving people have heard the name of this method. But there are very few of them have the proper knowledge about Duckworth-Lewis.   From this particular feature, we will come to know the history of Duckworth-Lewis and the process of it’s working.     Cricket is a game that pretty much depends on the mercy of the weather. Either through rain or bad light, playing time can be lost. This isn’t too much of a problem in two innings matches; after all, they are scheduled to last four or five days.     But one day matches run to a very tight schedule and any breaks due to bad weather can mean that the full number of overs can’t be bowled. Therefore, two English statisticians Frans Duckworth and Tony Lewis came up with a mathematical formula to ensure a result can always be reached in a reduced over match. This method was being applied at England in the second ODI between Zimbabwe and England on 1 January 1997.     The big idea behind the Duckworth-Lewis method is an equation that determines by how much the winning runs target for the team batting second in the match should be altered if bad weather reduces the number of overs that can be bowled.     The method works on the principle of team resources. This relates to how many players out of the batting side have yet to be dismissed and the number of balls remaining to be bowled in the innings. The greater the remaining resources of the batting side when the game is interrupted, the higher that team’s score is calculated to be under the Duckworth-Lewis method, or the lower their target number of runs to achieve victory.     The Duckworth-Lewis method isn’t very popular, mainly because it’s so incredibly complex but no one, as yet, has come up with a fairer system.     This particular method has the formula to determine a winning team. The formula is given below- Team 2’s per score= Team 1’s score X Team 2’s resources    

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